Home | About | Contact
Custom Search

 

Route 66 East Central California

The Eastern California route begins with a cruise down the Cajon Pass on an old section of Route 66.  Traveling this old road near Hesperia is like a flashback to the past.  Next, in Hesperia,  the historic Summit Inn welcomes all travelers off the Interstate 15. 

 

 

Summit Inn
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

The Summit Inn is a vintage eatery welcoming Route 66 travelers as they get to the top of the hill.

 

Green Tree Inn
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

 

Bob's Big Boy
Hesperia, CA
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Nearby, right off of Route 66 lies a Bob's Big Boy complete with Bob smiling as guests arrive at the door.  This appears to be one of the newer Big Boy restaurants.

Travel up the interstate another 15 or 20 minutes and you enter the town of Victorville and the Green Tree Inn.  Victorville is a great Route 66 town with highway markers and signs marking Route 66 historic points of interest.

Stop and have breakfast at Don's Coffee Shop or grab a snooze at the New Corral Motel.  As you make your way towards the Northern edge of Victorville, on your left you'll see the historic San Bernardino Fair sign.

 

Don's Coffee Shop
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

New Corral Motel>
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

San Bernardino Fair
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

 

Mahan's Half Acre
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

 

Route 66 Museum
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Next on the agenda is a stop over at the Route 66 Museum, formerly the First Bank Building.   In the museum are exhibits and films from the old road's glory days, including the actual sign from the Hula Girl.  Don't forget to grab a map or two before you leave.

 

Zamora's Body Shop
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

 

Next to the museum are the historic Barrel House and Wonder's Bakery, the latter which was once a former Circle K.  A bit up the street on the right-hand side is Desert Motors, an old used-car lot with old signage.  Continuing along the road, you'll encounter Hollandsburger Cafe, a throwback to the Mother Road's heyday.  Finally, before leaving Victorville, visit Zamora's Body Shop, a car garage that also does smog checks.Many thanks to Mike Lepker for Wonder's Bakery/Circle K info

 

Barrel House
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Wonder's Bakery
(Formerly Circle K)
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Desert Motors
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

 

After Victorville along Route 66 comes a town called Oro Grande.  A nice place to stop and shop or even just stretch your legs is the Oro Grande Implement Co.  A bit farther down is an old abandoned Mohawk Gas Station and the Route 66 Bar and Grill, the latter still open for business.  Over the next 10 mile stretch of highway, you'll encounter many abandoned buildings and houses, some barely left standing.  (If any of you know what these ruins were, don't forget to drop me a line!)  Especially of interest are some ruins on the left side of the road, one which looks like a house with no roof.

 

Route 66 Bar and Grill
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Old Gas Station?
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Abandoned Bulding
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

 

Lenwood Market
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Soon you will encounter the town of Lenwood, a city just before Barstow.  The Lenwood Market (which was Joe's Food Spot up until a couple years ago) is a good place to stop and grab ice, drinks, or something to snack on before you continue on your journey. Many thanks to Mike Lepker for info on Lenwood Market/Joe's Food Spot

 

Steve's Barber Shop
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Need a haircut?  Then drop by Steve's Barber Shop before you leave.   A great Kodak moment would have been a shot of the Lenwood Drive-in Theatre screen, abandoned for years after the I-15 was built.  Unfortunately, the screen has been bulldozed and no sign of it was left.

 

Do Drop Inn
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Right down the street is the Do Drop Inn, an interest place that appeared to be closed.  The walls invite you to stop and have chili.

Next on the agenda is the old railroad town of Barstow, full of activity and Route 66 life.  Hungry?  Stop and eat at the Burns Brothers Restaurant or grab a slice of pizza at Pizza Palace.  Pizza Palace started out as Shakey's, then became Straw Hat and finally Pizza Palace.

 

UPDATE : The Burns Bros. sign at the TA Truck Stop is now gone.  Update, Barstow Mural,  and Pizza Palace info courtesy Mike Lepker.

 

Barstow Motel( Formerly the Goldstone Bar)
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Burns Bros. Restaurant (Removed)
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Pizza Palace
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

 

Desert Lodge Motel
Barstow, CA
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

The Desert Lodge Motel and Nites Inn are just two of the many places to stop for a sleep over in Barstow.

 

Nites Inn Motel
Barstow, CA
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Although the marquee for the Nite's Inn is rather plain backlit plastic, it's still a motel alongside Route 66.

 

Whiting Bros. Motel
Postcard and info courtesy Mike & Terie Lepker

The postcard below of Whiting Bros. Motel was located right next to the Desert Lodge.  Unfortunately, like other vintage motor courts, Whiting Bros. was razed about 10 years ago.

(Below) For food of an international nature, you will come upon the Palm Cafe Restaurant for American-Chinese food and Carlos and Toto's for Mexican food (formerly Sander's Oasis Cafe.

 

Palm Cafe
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Carlos & Toto's
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Sander's Oasis (Carlos & Toto's)
Postcard courtesy Mike & Terie Lepker

 

Torches Motel
Barstow, CA
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

 

 

More motels then show up along the route such as the Torches. Right down the street is the Katz Restaurant for steaks and sports diamond shaped lettering.  

Katz
Barstow, CA
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

 

Here are a couple more Route 66 motels in Barstow, including the Route 66 Motel and Downtown Motel.

A definite must see is the historic El Rancho restaurant and motel with its towering sign located across the street from The Katz.   Although signs signal that the restaurant/motel is for sale, Route 66 is literally painted all over the walls.  On your way to the Beacon Bowl, now called Paradise Lanes, an interesting looking liquor store, Swiss Liquor, with bottles of liquor wearing little siesta hats beckon out to you.  However, Swiss Liquor was once called Pet Castle.

Paradise Lanes and Swiss Liquor predecessor info courtesy Mike Lepker

 

El Rancho Motel
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Swiss Liquor
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Beacon Bowl
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

 

More Barstow motels soon come up on the Route 66 stretch include the Stardust Inn, Brants Motel, and Sands Motel.  Travel a bit down the road and you'll encounter an abandoned gas station.

 

Stardust Inn
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Brant's Motel
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Sands Motel
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

 

Top Hat Liquor
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Next up are the Top Hat liquor store and the former site of the Bar-B-Que House.  This building was the "Steakeaters Restaurant" for many years, whose owner did catering for many a movie.  A new AutoZone store will sit where the Bar-B-Que House once fed a happy belly.  The Golden Dragon Restaurant a bit down the road was a former Denny's.  At the end of this stretch is the  and Terrible Herbst Gas Station.   Many thanks to Mike Lepker for the above info.

 

 

Bar-B-Que House
(Demolished)
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Golden Dragon
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

Terrible Herbst
Photo by RoadsidePeek.com

 

But before you get there, don't forget to pay a visit to Barstow Station.  Barstow Station is actually a new structure built at the site of an original McDonald's, and now also houses a Taco Bell and a gift shop.  Especially endearing is the McDonald's signage, a must see if you are in the area.  Curious to see what Barstow Station, a site that has been through three configurations, looked like in the past?  Check out Vintage 66 for a look at three old postcards.

Info on Barstow Station courtesy Mike Lepker

 

 

QUICK LINKS


 
 

 

 

 

© Copyright 1998-2017 Syd Nagoshi. All rights reserved. No portion of this document may be reproduced, copied or revised without written permission of the author.